Inside the Kurt Cobain Business

Two days after Kurt Cobain’s body was found in the greenhouse of their Seattle home, Courtney Love showed up late to a raucous candlelit gathering of distraught Nirvana fans. She played a grief-stricken, vulgar recording of herself reading part of his suicide note, led the crowd in a chant calling Cobain an “asshole,” and handed out some of Cobain’s clothes, which she continued to do in the weeks that followed. Twenty-five years later, one of the sweaters that Love gave to a family friend is expected to fetch $300,000 at an auction this weekend.

“Courtney couldn’t have realized that the value of these things would be worth what they are today,” Darren Julien, who is running that auction, tells Fortune. “Those are John Lennon prices.”

The most reticent of rock stars—one who agonized about his artistic truth being fed into the thresher of corporatism—now commands his own economy from beyond the grave. In 1991, the cover of Nirvana’s major-label debut, Nevermind, satirically depicted a baby chasing a dollar bill on a fishhook. In 2019, the Kurt Cobain business is big business.

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Longtime Aerosmith engineer auctions off his private collection

On Saturday, March 16, Backstage Auctions, Inc. presents the private collection of David Frangioni, an award-winning veteran of the music industry, for auction. Frangioni started in the industry early, playing live at 12 years old, where he was focused on drumming with bands in Boston. He found the future of drumming in technology, starting his career first with a consulting business at age 16, which helped to make his connection with Aerosmith, where he was their in-house engineer/technologist for 13 years and continued working on their singles, albums, tours and even the theme song for the Spider-Man animated television series with Joe Perry.

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